Blurring Lines Between Arts and Sciences, Journal of Humanities in Rehabilitation Spring Issue 2017

By Sarah R. Blanton, PT, DPT, NCS, Editor-in-Chief

As a child I was soft-spoken and shy.  Although my grades were good, I was far from the star of the class, and frequently blended in with the general mass of my small rural high school. My high school biology professor, Mr. Burke, seemed to recognize my struggles and sought to pull me out of my shell. “Speak up, Squeaky!” he would say as I stuttered over an explanation of photosynthesis.  While in most other cases one may find a weird nickname disparaging, my classmates knew to be called something other than your given name was a high compliment in Mr. Burke’s class. Nearly better than an A, this recognition was the sign of respect by our high school’s best teacher. When he gave you a nickname, you knew you were special.  My enthusiasm for biology was only surpassed by my passion for photography, and I vividly remember the day Mr. Burke showed me his camera collection. As faculty leader for our yearbook, he was in charge of all photography and had the most amazing cameras I had ever seen! He had German Leica SLRs, mid-range and large format cameras—classics in a time that stands in stark contrast to photography in the age of smartphones and digital images.

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